Posts tagged as:

space

Venus Answers

June 10, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Venus Answers

And to round off the Venus saturated week, a bit of information on the actual planet rather than just how to watch it. Have a look at the questions if you missed them. 1.     The morning and evening stars were known to a lot of ancient cultures as they are fairly obvious – the […]

Read more →

Venus Transit – recovering from yesterday.

June 7, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Venus Transit – recovering from yesterday.

Yesterday I live tweeted/instagrammed/blogged/Facebooked the transit of Venus. All that running up and down stairs, stopping the telescope and screen from falling over, searching for the sun, swearing at Telstra as my mobile internet goes out again, and trying to take photos while balancing everything in the wind was exhausting. Thank whatever deity for fast shutter […]

Read more →

Wordless Wednesday – Transit of Venus Live!

June 6, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Wordless Wednesday – Transit of Venus Live!

In my first science live blogging/tweeting/instagramming event I’m attempting to cover today’s transit of Venus. As I get photos I will be adding them here, plus you can follow my tweets. For a slightly more exciting version, I’ve also embedded a video from a live feed from the Exploratorium, but you need Flash to see […]

Read more →

Quiz – The Venus Edition

June 5, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Quiz – The Venus Edition

What else? With the transit tomorrow it has to be Venus. Who realised the morning and evening stars were the same thing? How hot is Venus and why? What are the two unusual things about Venus’ ‘day’? Why is Venus often called Earth’s sister or twin? What’s the picture up the top? Answers here 🙂

Read more →

The Transit of Venus

June 4, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for The Transit of Venus

Photo of the 2004 transit by Jan Herold. If your social media feeds are anything like mine, they are currently going crazy about the transit of Venus. I have emails, tweets, updates and more tweets reminding me that it’s the last time this century we’ll get to see it. So for those of you for […]

Read more →

Modern Moon Myths

May 14, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Modern Moon Myths

These pop up all the time, the moon has been just a little bit important in human history and we’ve had lots of time to tell myths about it. It would be nice to think that as a group we’ve grown out of werewolves and love spells, except we’re still doing it. There are new moon […]

Read more →

Wordless Wednesday – Supermoon?

May 9, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Wordless Wednesday – Supermoon?

We were outside on Sunday night so I grabbed the camera and got some shots of the spectacular moon rising. I didn’t grab the tripod, so sorry for the fuzziness. This is an actual photo, not a white dot on a cheap graphics program. I need to learn about using the camera on manual if […]

Read more →

Wordless Wednesday – A Billion Tiny Moons

April 18, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Wordless Wednesday – A Billion Tiny Moons

Sometimes we all feel the need for pretty pictures, which is generally when I head over to NASA. The colours and images and thought of peering into the past are fascinating and soothing. And last night I saw something I’d never even heard of before. I don’t know many details of astronomy, but at least […]

Read more →

Solar System’s Biggest Volcano

March 12, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Solar System’s Biggest Volcano

It’s been said that the reason dinosaurs are fascinating is because they’re ‘big, fierce and extinct.’ Olympus Mons, or Mount Olympus, on Mars almost fulfills those criteria – it’s the solar system’s biggest volcano, it’s a volcano, and seeing it’s on another planet it’s as inaccessible as dinosaurs. Firstly the stats – Olympus Mons is […]

Read more →

Star Answers Again

March 9, 2012 Earth and Beyond
Thumbnail image for Star Answers Again

How did you do? If you haven’t seen the quiz yet, shut your eyes and click back here. 1.     Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky. It was actually very important in setting the Egyptian calendar because it is prominent and easily spotted. It is so bright because of a combination of […]

Related Posts with Thumbnails
Read more →